• Suzanne

Silly stories and games to target speech sound(s)

Speech practice shouldn’t end once you leave the therapy room. These skills should be worked on at home and in school in natural and fun ways. Siblings and other students can also join in. Once you know what sound(s) your child is targeting in therapy, you can practice these at home without your child even noticing.


Creating silly stories is a great way to work on targeted speech sounds. Once you have targeted sounds and pictures you can use these over and over to create a number of different silly stories.


Silly stories

  • Gather 10 – 16 pictures beginning with the targeted sound (or ending in the targeted sound if applicable).

  • Name each picture and put them face down on the table or floor.

  • Take turns to pick up two pictures and make a silly story using the two words.

  • When it is your turn, try to use as many examples of the target sound(s) as possible.


Example:

“One day the sock and soap sat down on the sand and ate a sandwich



Variations of games such ‘I went to see…” or “I’m going on holidays and I’m bringing” are fun memory games to play with the family or in a class. Tell the group that they must use words beginning or ending in the targeted sound.


Remember to keep it fun. Semantic cues could be used as reminders if the child forgets a word. E.g. “it’s something you drive” or “it’s a pet and it’s furry”


I went to see……


  • Choose someone whose name starts with the target sounds E.g. “The King of the Castle” or “Sammy Snake” or “Fireman Fred”.

  • Say “ I went to see the King of the Castle and I took…..” and choose one of the pictures E.g. “cat”. Place the picture face down in a line from left to right.

  • Next person says “I went to see the King of the Castle and I took a cat and a ……” and then choose another picture E.g. “car”.

  • The winner is the person who can remember the most things!

  • Initially, help can be given by letting the child turn over the forgotten picture.


Remember to keep it fun. Semantic cues could be used as reminders if the child forgets a word. E.g. “it’s something you drive” or “it’s a pet and it’s furry”


Claire & Suzanne


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Charleville, Co. Cork, Ireland

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